20 Great Ways To Learn Multiplication Facts - Times Tables

Welcome to my second blog in my new series focusing on how to support the older child in Primary school. In this blog I share 20 great ways that can help children learn multiplication facts, or more commonly known as times tables.

Let me point out from the beginning, that before helping your child to remember multiplication facts, it is essential that they have an understanding of the concept of multiplication. Multiplication and division can be taught together as they are the opposite operations of each other. Children need to experience both operations together to gain a deep knowledge about the idea of multiplying and dividing.

It is important to expose your child to a variety of terms relating to multiplication so they have a greater vocabulary when it comes to mathematics. Below are examples of two concepts that can be used in multiplication problems.

“Groups of”

applesThis is when objects are placed in groups. You can multiply the amount of objects in one group by the amount of groups.




“Rows of”

imagesThis is when objects are placed in rows. You can multiply the amount of objects in one row by the amount of rows.

Children need to understand the both concepts above as well as knowing the terms multiply, times, product (answer to a multiplication problem) and factors (the numbers that are multiplied together).

Here are some strategies that your child may use to work out a multiplication problem (3 x 5=) before the facts become known. These are the strategies taught in younger years.

1. Repeated addition : 5 + 5 + 5 = 15   or   3 + 3 + 3 + 3 + 3 = 15

2. Skip count: 5, 10, 15      or       3, 6, 9, 12, 15

3. Use a times table chart

4. Draw a picture  imgres-1

5. Draw an array

imgres

 

 

 

Once the child has a clear understanding of multiplication, it is then time to learn all their facts. Most teachers set a particular times table per week that the children must revise. Below is a list of 20 ways to help children remember multiplication facts.

1. Memory Game

memoryWrite a multiplication question on one card and the answer on another. Do this for as many facts as you want. Turn all the cards over and your child needs to find the matching cards.

 

2. Nine times table trick up to times by ten.

9xtablesHave your child put all their fingers up. If the question is 9 x 6, they put their sixth finger down. The answer is shown on their fingers. The amount of fingers in front of the finger that is down is the tens number and the amount of fingers after the finger that is down is the ones number. Therefore the answer is 54.

3. Dominoes

dominoesTurn all the dominoes over. Take turns flipping the dominoes over and multiplying the two numbers. You can make it harder by flipping one domino over and adding the dots together and turning over another domino and adding those dots together. Then you could multiply the two higher numbers together.

4. Multiplication jumping

jumponanswerHave all the answers of a particular times table set (eg 5 times tables) written on different cards (or the facts that your child struggles with remembering). Spread them out on the floor. Call out a multiplication question, eg 5 x 6 and the child has to quickly find the answer and jump on it.

5. Dice roll

GridpaperPrint off some grid paper or use grid paper from a maths book. Roll two dice and draw the rectangle or square on the grid paper. Your child then writes the multiplication fact and answer inside the shape.

6. Egg Carton Multiplication

EggcartongameWrite the numbers one to twelve in each hole of an empty egg carton. Put two objects inside the carton and close the lid. Shake the egg carton up and open it. The child says the multiplication question and answer depending on what hole the objects are in. Eg 4 x 3 = 12

7. Karate belts

karatebeltsGet your child to pretend they are a multiplication ninja. In order to get their new belt they must be able to answer all their multiplication facts set on that particular belt. All the multiplication facts for a set (eg 7 times tables) must be in random order to avoid the child just skip counting.

8. Groups of

groupsofRoll the dice and record the multiplication fact using a “groups of” representation. They could do the same for a “rows of” representation (also known as an array).

 

 

9. Multiplies game

multiplesMake a card with a number in the middle. On the outside of the card put lots of different numbers (some multiplies of the number and some not). Your child then uses pegs to pick all the correct multiplies. You can list the correct numbers on the back of the card.

10. Multiplication Jenga

jengaWrite multiplication questions and stick on the side of slim building blocks. Stack the blocks up (3 going one way and then the next three blocks going the other way - just like Jenga) Your child takes time to slide out one of the blocks without knocking down the tower. They need to answer the multiplication fact on the block they got out.

11. Multiplication board game

MultiboardgameMake up a board game with multiplication questions on each square. If your child lands on a square they need to answer the question before they roll for their next go.

 

 

12. Multiply cut outs

numbermultisUse large number cutouts and a texta. Your child writes all the multiplies or multiplication facts associated with that number on the inside.

 

 

13. Number fishing

numberfishingUse magnetic numbers and a string with a paper clip on it. Your child puts the “fishing line” into a bucket with the magnetic numbers and “catches” a number. They need to repeat this to get a second number. They can then multiply the two numbers together.

 14. Multiplication Bingo

images-1Each child has a bingo card with numbers that will become the answers to multiplication facts. Play the game with one child or a few children. If playing with a few, make sure they all have different bingo cards. The caller reads out a multiplication fact and if the answer in on the card, the player puts an object on it. Once all numbers on the card have objects on it, the child can call out “Bingo”.

15. Multiplication Snakes and Ladders

imgres-2Play snakes and ladders with a twist. Each square will have a multiplication fact that the child must answer before they have their next go.

 

16. Multiplication soccer

dcac1bac36106350e19e6122ea144a6dWrite numbers all over a soccer ball. The child throws the ball up and catches it. They look at which numbers their thumbs are touching and multiply them together. If they get the correct answer they can shoot the ball 2 metres from the goal post. If they get it in the goal, they move back another 2 metres and answer a new multiplication fact. The aim is to get back as far as they can. If they get the answer wrong or miss the goal, they must start again. For every correct answer they move 2 metres further away from the goal.

17. Multiplication Battle Ships

images-1Use a battle ship card that has an x and y axis with numbers on each axis. Get each player to draw some battle ships that are 1 ship that is 3 squares long, 2 ships that are 2 squares long and 3 ships that are 1 square long (altogether there would be 6 ships). Each player takes turns to try and work out where the other players ships are without looking. They ask if there is a ship at 6  x 8  position as well as saying the answer. Always start with the y axis. The player puts a counter on successful hits. Whoever sinks all the ships first is the winner.

18. Pack of cards

imagesShuffle a deck of cards and split in half. Turn over a card from each pile and multiply them together. Jacks represent 10, Queens represent 11, Kings represent 12 and Aces represent 1.

19. Multiplication Songs

images-2There are a variety of multiplication songs out there. Get your child to listen to a song for each set of times tables. You can listen to these songs through youtube or buy a CD online.

20. Multiplication with Clocks

searchGet your child to look at the clock and state the numbers that the hands are pointing to. Multiply them together and say the answer. It would be great to use a clock where a partner can turn the hands to various numbers.

Hopefully these 20 ideas will help your children to be engaged and enthusiastic towards learning their multiplication facts. Knowing multiplication facts will help children solve mathematical problems. Ensure that your children have a solid understanding of multiplication before rote learning the facts.

Please share this blog if you have found it insightful and if you believe it offers practical information that your can implement at home or in the classroom. Remember to email a copy of it to yourself for reference later on.

Until next time …timestable

Kelly Pisani

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How To Read With Your Older Child

Welcome to the first blog in my next series focusing on the older child in Primary school. There is so much information for parents and educators on how to help children in the younger grades achieve their potential but it seems to taper off when a child reaches 9 or 10 years old. In this series, I aim to give lots of practical advice and tips to help parents of children aged 9 - 12 years old to be able to support the learning which is going on in the classroom, at home.

This first blog “How to read with your older child” will outline 5 ways that parents can support the reading development of their child. All children in the middle to upper grades of Primary school are given mandatory reading each night as part of their homework task. Most parents are at a loss, as to how to support their independent reader to ensure that their child is understanding the information from their more complex texts.

Like with a younger child, the love of reading needs to be the focus. Unfortunately as children get older, support for reading at home gets less and less as parents expect that children sit and read independently without any interaction. Reading is seen as a solitary task and any difficulties the child is having may go undetected. If they find reading difficult, especially comprehending what they are reading, they will begin to dislike this task and it will cause bigger issues in the future.

A great quote I always refer to is that “comprehension, floats on conversation”. This is very true for the older child. They need many opportunities to discuss the harder themes, more difficult vocabulary and more complex sentence structure that becomes present in their harder texts they are given to read.

Below is a list of 5 activities that you could do with your child when they have the homework task of reading for a specific amount of time. They are all engaging and aim to help your child have a better understanding of what they are reading. Maybe you can try these with your child every second night.

1. The child plays the role of predicator

images-1Whether your child is about to read a new text or start a new chapter, it is very important for them to be able to predict what could happen. This skill will give you an indication of whether they understand how texts work, can use information of previous texts or chapters to guide their thoughts and to see if they are understanding the plot or themes occurring in the text.

Parent tips

  • Get your child to tell you verbally what has happened (the events) in a previous chapter and what they predict could happen next.
  • Get your child to tell you what a character has been like in previous chapters and what they predict they could be like in the next one.
  • Get your child to give you examples to back up their prediction. Eg I predict the main character will get detention for not handing in homework because in the previous chapter the teacher said that if he forgets his homework again there will be consequences.
  • After the child has read a chapter, get them to come back and let you know if their prediction was right.

2. The child plays the role of clarifier

imgres-1As the child gets older they will be exposed to more challenging texts which will have a higher level of vocabulary. It is essential that children learn the skills to be able to work out what a word means by the context that it is in. A dictionary can also play a role, but we want the child to problem solve first and use it to check what they think.

Parent tips

  • Give your child a sticky note and get them to write down three words or phrases that they find difficult in the text while reading. After reading for the specified time, get your child to tell you the words/phrases. Encourage them to read the paragraph aloud to you that contains the difficult word or phrase and get them to have a go at explaining what it could be.
  • Get your child to try and put any difficult words in their own sentences to see if they understand what it means.
  • Have your child think of synonyms (words that mean the same) that the author could have used instead. Have a discussion with them as to why the author may have chosen that word. Eg despised instead of not liked.
  • Discuss any issues or difficult topics that may have come up during the chapter. It could be the emotions associated with a character dealing with a situation eg bullying, death, sickness, loneliness. Get your child to see the situation from a variety of character perspectives. A parent could ask them, why do you think the character acted like that?

3. The child plays the role of Questioner

Unknown-2Being able to ask a “good” question will give you an understanding of the comprehension skills of your child. A child needs to be able to ask questions that require a deeper understanding to answer them. Asking the right questions in life will indicate that the child knows his/her weakness and can get clarification to keep developing their understanding. Starting questions with “how” and “why” will encourage this deeper understanding.

Parent tips

  • Get your child to read a chapter aloud to you. After that, get them to read it again independently. They can then form 2 or 3 questions about the plot, issues or characters that start with how or why. Have a discussion about the chapter using the questions as a focus.
  • Encourage your child to research about a particular issue or topic that may come up in the text, relating to a question they have. Eg finding out more information about conditions in the depression that might impact of what people did to survive. This research could come about from a question like “Why did the main character steal a loaf of bread, when he knew he could go to gaol?
  • Encourage your child to ask two questions about why an author has used a particular format or character to convey a message. Eg Why does the author use diary entries in the book? Have a discussion about how authors have their own perspective and that impacts on how the text is written.
  • You can also answer their questions by referring to the text to show your child how you need to use what is written and your understanding about the world to form your answer.

4. The child plays the role of Summariser

imgresA child needs to be about to summarise the main points or events that occur in their text. They need to understand what is important and how it contributes to the purpose of the text.

 

Parent tips

  • Get your child to retell what they just read. Ensure that they give you lots of information as you have not read it.
  • Get your child to write a summary of the text that they have read that is less than 60 words. (a, is, I count as words). This will help them to become more succinct.
  • Get your child to explain the changes in a particular character during that chapter. Ensure they tell you how and why they have changed. Ask them how they are like that character and how they are unlike that character.
  • Get your child to tell you the purpose of that chapter or text. Why does the author include it or write about it. Your child needs to give evidence from the text justifying why they think that.

5. The child plays the role of Applier

imagesA child needs to be able to understand what they have read and use this knowledge to apply it to another aspect of their lives. This is a very difficult concept as it requires two steps for children to undertake.

Parent tips

  • After your child has read the chapter or entire text get them to write down 2 new facts they have learnt that they did not know before. Get them to share their discoveries with you.
  • Get your child to suggest ways that they can use their new understanding in their own lives. (eg Cyber bullying is a really big problem now - The child says to protect themselves from it they will not go on the internet after 8pm to reduce the risk)
  • Have a discussion with your child about issues that have come up in the text and how to solve problems if they do arise.

All Primary school children need to be engaged in three different reading experiences. The three experiences are modelled, guided and independent. When a child gets older (9-12 years old), they tend to be only involved in independent reading at home. We need to ensure as parents and educators, to give as many modelled and guided reading opportunities as possible to lay a really strong foundation of reading skills. Older children still need to hear adults read, as they will hear the fluency and reading strategies needed for more challenging texts. Read a variety of texts aloud to your child as much as possible. Continue to get your older child to read to you now and again and praise them for their developing comprehension skills.

I hope this blog has given you some practical ideas on how to continue to guide your child’s reading skills when they are older. Please continue to share, comment and spread the word about CREATING A LEARNING ENVIRONMENT. I really appreciate all your support and feedback.

Until next time …readwitholderchild

Kelly Pisani

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10 science experiments every child should experience

science experimentsWelcome to my next blog in the holiday series. In this post I focus on the value of children conducting science experiments at home and in the classroom.

Science is a key learning area that is not taught well in Australian primary schools compared to other countries. Maybe this is the result of many teachers not having a deep understanding about scientific concepts or that parents place a higher emphasis on numeracy and literacy concepts. Regardless of the reason, it is our role as educators and parents to ensure that children are having the opportunity to conduct a variety of science experiments which will help them form a strong understanding about the world around them.

I have put together a list of 10 inexpensive science experiments that can be conducted at home by children from the ages of 3 - 12 years old. Try one or all of them with your child and see your child develop their knowledge about a specific scientific concept.

1. Water movement experiment

Water movement

Materials needed: Cabbage leaves, containers, water, food dye

Concept taught: Osmosis (diffusion of water through cells) Plants rely on osmosis to move water from the roots to the tallest part of the plant.

 

1. Pour an equal amount of water into a few containers

2. Put a few drops of different coloured food dye in each container

3. Put a large cabbage leaf in each container

4. Observe cabbage leaves over a 2 week period

2. Rock Candy experiment

rock candyMaterials needed: 2-3 cups of sugar, 1 cup of water, jars, candy flavouring, food colouring, skewers, large saucepan, pegs

Concepts taught: Learning about solutes and solvents. The solute (sugar) is mixed with a solvent (water) to make a super saturated solution. After taking the solution off the heat, the sugar will begin to crystallise.

1. Dissolve a cup of sugar in a cup of water over heat in a saucepan.

2. Slowly add more and more sugar until no more will dissolve. (the water will look cloudy)

3. Take the saucepan off the heat and add the candy flavouring if desired and allow solution to cool.

4. Cut the skewers to the right length, soak the end in water and roll the end of the skewer in sugar. Allow the sticks to dry completely.

5. Pour sugar solution equally into jars. You can add a few drops of different food colouring dyes to each jar.

6. Put a dried sugar coated skewer in each jar and secure with a peg. Make sure that the skewer is not touching any part of the jar.

7. Observe skewers over 2 weeks. (The children can eat the rock candy when the experiment is over)

3. Plant maze experiment

PlantgrowingMaterials needed: shoe box, extra cardboard, scissors, broad bean plant

Concept taught: Plants need light to grow. Plants grow towards the light.

 

 

1. Cut a small hole at one end of the shoe box. Ensure that all other holes are taped up so only the hole you made will let light in.

2. Cut two pieces of cardboard and stick one of the left (a third of the way up and one on the right. (two thirds of the way up)

3. Stand the shoe box up ensuring the hole is up the top. Put the broad bean plant down the bottom sidewards. (ensure the broad bean plant is well watered)

4. Put the shoe box lid back on and secure with tape. Put shoe box in a sunny position near a window.

5. Open the shoe box in 4 to 5 days and observe the results.

4. Elephant toothpaste experiment

FoamMaterials needed: 1/2 a cup of 6% hydrogen peroxide, empty soft drink bottle, tray, food colouring, dishwashing liquid, warm water, yeast

 

Concept taught: Chemical reactions using a catalyst. The hydrogen peroxide breaks down into oxygen and water. The large volume of oxygen quickly explodes out of the bottle.

1. Put an empty soft drink bottle in the middle of a tray.

2. Mix the hydrogen peroxide, 3 drops of food colouring and a squirt of dishwashing liquid in the soft drink bottle.

3. In a separate container, mix 1 tsp of  yeast and 2 tbsp of warm water.

4. Pour the yeast mixture into the soft drink bottle and watch the chemical reaction.

5. Dissolving egg shells experiment

imagesMaterials needed: 4 clear cups, 4 eggs, vinegar,water

Concept taught: Acid base reactions. The vinegar is an acid and dissolves the eggshell which is made up of calcium carbonate (a base). When the acid and base react carbon dioxide is formed (seen as bubbles in the experiment)

  1. Put 1 egg in each clear cup.
  2. Add vinegar to two of the cups and water to the other two cups. (ensure each egg is submerged by the liquid in their cup)
  3. Observe the results over 7 days and compare the eggs that were covered in vinegar to the eggs covered in water.

6. Walking on eggs experiment

walkoneggsMaterials needed: many large trays of eggs, plastic sheet

Concept taught: Shapes of objects effect how pressure is distributed.

1. Put down a plastic sheet and lay a few trays of eggs together on it

2. Walk over the trays of eggs ensuring your feet are flat when walking

3. Walk over the eggs on heels or toes to see if it makes any difference

7. Lava lamp experiment

LavalampMaterials needed: One soft drink bottle, water, vegetable oil, food colouring, Alka-Seltzer tablet broken up

Concept taught: Oil and water do not mix. Oil is less dense and will stay above the water. The food colouring will drop through the oil and mix with the water. The tablet (citric acid and baking soda) releases carbon dioxide gas and the bubbles rise to the top, taking coloured water with it. When the gas is released at the top the coloured water will drop down again.

1. Fill the soft drink bottle a third of the way with water.

2. Fill the rest of the bottle with vegetable oil.

3. Add a couple of drops of food colouring into the soft drink bottle.

4. Add the broken Alka-Seltzer tablet into the soft drink bottle.

5. Observe results. When the experiment has finished, you can add another tablet to watch it again.

8. Make a thermometer

thermometerMaterials needed: 500ml jar, straw, clay, water, rubbing alcohol, food colouring, marker

Concept taught: Convection (the process of liquid expanding and contracting as a result of temperature) When a liquid is heated, it becomes less dense and expands. It will rise up on the thermometer (the straw). When the liquid is cooled, it contracts, becomes dense and goes down on the thermometer (the straw).

1. Fill up the empty jar with equal amounts of water and rubbing alcohol until it is ¼ of the way up the jar.

2. Put a few drops of food colouring in the liquid to make it easier to see.

3. Put the cap back on the jar and secure it with tape.

4. Mix up the liquid

5. Put a hole in the centre of the cap so a clear straw can fit through. (try to make the hole a similar size to the straw)

6. Make sure the straw is in the liquid but does not touch the bottom of the jar.

7. Use clay around the straw to ensure the jar is air tight and to hold the straw in position.

8. Draw a line on the jar with a marker to indicate room temperature.

9. Put the thermometer in different places to see what happens (eg direct sunlight, fridge)

9. Liquid explosion experiment

dietcokeMaterials needed: One bottle of diet coke, roll of mentos

Concept taught: The effect of carbon dioxide. Each mentos candy has lots of little pits over it, which means they have lots of great places for carbon dioxide bubbles to form. After all of the gas is released, the liquid is pushed out of the bottle at a great speed to form a big soft drink blast.

1. Stand the bottle of diet coke upright with the lid off in the middle of a large area.

2. Ensure everyone is standing clear

3. Unwrap the mentos roll and put all of them into the diet coke at the same time. (This can be quite tricky as you need them to go in very quickly)

4. Run into the safety zone and watch the reaction.

10. Bacteria/germs experiment

potato bacteria growthMaterials needed: two potatoes, zip lock bags, a variety of surfaces

Concept taught: The best surfaces for bacteria to grow. Bacteria are microscopic organisms that live everywhere. Certain conditions cause bacteria to be more prevalent than others. The importance of hygiene can be discussed after observing the results.

1. Wash hands with warm soapy water before commencing experiment.

2. Cut two potatoes into slices using a clean knife.

3. Label 8 zip lock bags with the surfaces : hands, mouth, toilet, dirt, floor, sink, bin lid, bench

4. Take one potato slice and rub it all over your hands. Once done put it in the corresponding bag and zip it up.

5. Repeat process with the other 7 surfaces.

6. Put bags in a dark warm spot for 1 - 2 weeks.

7. Observe which potato slice had the most mould as bacteria helps mould grow.

I hope you have enjoyed reading this post and are enthusiastic to try some of these at home or in your classroom. Science gets children to ask questions and clarify their own understanding of how our world works. For older children, encourage them to try and explain the science behind each experiment.

Next week I will be starting a blog series aimed at educators and parents of children aged 8 - 12 years old. Please continue to share, comment and spread the news about CREATING A LEARNING ENVIRONMENT.

Until next time …

Kelly Pisani

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20 Activities For The School Holidays That Will Keep Children Busy For Hours

Holiday activitiesSchool holidays can be a trying time for many parents. Not only does it mean having the children home for two or more weeks, eating them out of house and home but it usually involves listening to what seems like the endless whinging from their children claiming they are bored.

Unfortunately our society makes us believe that we need to spend money in order to entertain our children. We need to take them places, buy them the newest technology and arrange for many play dates for our child with their friends. I am hoping that I can dispel these myths with this blog.

Below is a list of 20 great activities that you could do with your child during the school holidays. You may get them started on one of these projects and then let them continue it. All these activities are engaging, inexpensive and help your child develop some of their skills.

1. Grass Head

grassheadFill stockings with soil and put some grass seeds in the soil. Tie a knot in the stocking and stand the ball of soil up the correct way. Your child can decorate their grass heads however they want. Over the coming weeks the grass will start to grow and your child can give their grass heads haircuts. Make sure the grass heads are put in a sunny position and are watered regularly.




2. Time Capsule

timecapsuleChildren can put anything they want in a time capsule that they can open at a later date (usually years later). They may write some things about themselves, about their life or about their environment. They may want to write it down, make a movie and save it on usb or do something completely different. Encourage them to be as creative as possible. They can decorate their time capsule and put it away for safe keeping.

3. Camp

camp indoorSet up some tents in the backyard and have a camping adventure while never leaving your house. You can cook your food on an open fire. (Always have parent supervision for this). You could get creative by making damper. If the weather is not good, why not put the tent up in the lounge room.

 

4. Create a flower garden

Flower gardenLet your child set up their own little garden in the backyard or on your balcony. Get the child to put their own little fence up and plant some flowers that they have chosen. They may want to paint rocks with the names of the types of flowers that they have chosen.

 

5. Magical garden

Magical gardenLet your child use their imagination and create a magical garden for fairies or elves. They can collect things on a walk that would suit a magical garden. Buy a couple of little solar lights to add to the magical element. Be as creative as possible.

 

6. Play garden

Play gardenSet up a garden that children can play in and get dirty. Put lots of gardening tools and buckets in the area and let your child loose in there.

 

7. Recycled furniture project

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIf you are feeling a little more adventurous why not try up-cycling an old piece of furniture into something else. Your child can help with sanding, painting and decorating. There are many ideas on the internet and Pinterest.

 

 

 

8. Bird house

birdhouseHelp your child construct a bird house with anything around the house. Get your child to paint it and help hang it up in the backyard or on a balcony. They can add bird seeds and water. They could try and take photos of birds that use their little bird house.

 

9. Make play dough

makeplaydoughChildren love making things so why not try your hand at making play dough. There are so many recipes out there, some that use cooking methods while others require no cooking. Your child could read the recipe and complete all the steps with your supervision. The best part is, after they have made it, they can use the play dough to make other things.

10. Conduct Science experiments

flowerexperiementChildren love investigating how things work so allowing them to conduct experiments will keep them entertained for hours. There are many simple experiments that can be set up at home. My next week’s blog will consist of 20 easy science experiments that can be conducted at home to help develop children’s understanding of our world. Keep your eye out for it, if you are interested in this area.

11. Building with pop sticks

popstickcreationsPop sticks can be purchased from any discount shop. All your child will need for this activity are pop sticks and craft glue. You may give them ideas of what to make or leave it up to them. Ideas could include, towers, bridges, or houses.

 

12. Art Activities

ArtactivityLots of children love creating artworks. Why not complete this simple, yet effective hand art piece. Research other simple artworks that your child could have a go at.

 

 

 

13. Making a boat

BoatMaking boats is a time honoured tradition that many children enjoy on a regular basis. If your child has never experienced this, it is a good one to try. Collect lots of recycling items and get your child to investigate the best designs for boats through trial and error. If you do not live near a body of water, you could just fill up a large container or bath to test the boats. You could also have a competition to see which child can create a boat that sails the furthest or floats for the longest.

14. Making Catapults

catapultThis is an activity that boys tend to be drawn to. Children make simple catapults with the aim of pushing something through the air. They can continually change their design to get an object to go further. There are many designs on the internet that children can use for inspiration.

 

15. Making Pasta

makepastaCooking has always remained a great activity for children to be involved with. Creating pasta from scratch is an engaging activity for children. Pasta rolling machines are inexpensive these days. It is important that children learn how things are made as many of them only have an experience of eating food from packets on the shelves of supermarkets.

16. Using Tools

buildingUsing an old piece of wood, get your child to use tools to attach things on it. They could screw in a screw or hammer in a nail. The options are endless. The image above gives you some ideas of what they can put onto their wood.

17. Large painting

LargepaintingUsing a large piece of calaco, or old bed sheet, draw pictures on it and allow your child to paint it in what ever colour they want. Spread it out in the backyard and each child can be responsible for an area to paint. When it is finished, you could use it as a table cloth or cubby house roof.

18. Beading

beadingYour child can create a lot of things using beads. A great idea is a sun catcher. Attach strings to a branch and put beads on each. After each string has enough beads tie a secure knot. Hang the sun catcher up outside. Alternatively you could make a wind chime or jewellery.

19. Balloon bowl

Balloon bowlBlow up a balloon. Cover the bottom half with craft glue and put confetti or bits of scrap paper all over it. Allow it to dry. When it has all dried, pop the balloon and the bowl will be ready.

20. Paper Mache

papermacheThis messy play is loved by many children. Cover an object in your handmade glue, using flour and water to make the glue (and some salt to prevent mould). Put newspaper strips over the glue and continue the process until the entire object it covered. Allow to dry over night and do a few more layers the next day. Leave it to dry again. Your paper mache is now ready for painting. You could make a piñata or animal or anything else that your child is interested in.

I hope you have enjoyed reading this post and it has given you some inspiration for some activities to do with your child during the school holidays. Your child will be engaged in these activities and will develop so many skills and deepen their knowledge from completing them. These activities will keep your child entertained for hours while not ruining your bank account.

Thank you for continuing to share my blog. I really appreciate it. I would love to read about any great ideas that you have that have been tried and tested in your household for school holidays.

Until next time …

Kelly Pisani

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